Bright Idea from Pantone

       

       

Neon hues have been hot both on the runway and in the home, and Pantone’s new Fashion + Home nylon brights collection addresses those colors with 21 vibrant shades to help designers working with this fabric. The new collection is the first time Pantone has specifically targeted nylon, and now provides a standard for accurate color selection, specification and reproduction in these hues for it.

“After years of ‘playing it safe,’ consumers are once again embracing color – in a big way,” said Laurie Pressman, vice president of fashion, home and interiors at Pantone. “From the runway to the retail selling floor, vibrant, lively colors continue to make an impact on the world of fashion and design. Our nylon brights collection was developed to inspire designers with a selection of colors that energize and excite.”

The collection is available in two formats: as a set of nylon swatches or as individual swatch cards. The set, available for $99.95, contains 21 loose-format nylon swatches arranged by color family on a metal ring and includes a BHT-free amber UV protective pouch to protect the colors when not in use. In addition, all Pantone Fashion + Home nylon brights collection purchases include Pantone Color Manager Software, a versatile application that provides digital data for the nylon brights to update popular design applications including Adobe Creative Suite, QuarkXPress, Corel Painter, and others. The swatch cards are sold individually for $12.95 for a four-inch-square, double-folded fabric card (which is 4 by 8 inches unfolded). All colors in the nylon brights collection are dyed in Nylon 6.6, which has improved light fastness and wash fastness over Nylon 6.

“The idea of these bold, vibrant tones, formulated specifically for nylon, opens up a whole new opportunity to play with color in a fabric that is tried and true for us,” said Deborah Lloyd, creative director, Kate Spade New York. “I adore bright [fluorescent] colors, as does our consumer, and I can’t wait to start experimenting with the nylon brights collection.”