Lights On in Dallas

The Dragonfly Shade with Snake Basket Metal Base from Dale Tiffany has a dark bronze with verde green finish. daletiffany.com

The Dragonfly Shade with Snake Basket Metal Base from Dale Tiffany has a dark bronze with verde green finish. daletiffany.com

By Andrea Lillo

Lighting introductions at this month’s Dallas International Lighting Market may range in styles, but overall clean design still reigns, and manufacturers differentiate collections by mixing materials, focusing on shapes or adding details such as crystals or specialty finishes.

In addition, demands for lower price points and energy efficient options also continue to shape manufacturers’ offerings.

At this market, Brad Smith, chief executive officer, E.L.K. Lighting, sees one trend continuing: “uncluttered design elements with a slant towards transitional styling.” And now that consumers are downsizing their homes, “smaller scaled items have heightened demand,” he said. For colors, neutrals are still the ticket, led by bronze finishes.

One of the most dominant trends is the natural casual style, said Katja Hockenberg, vice president of design, Pacific Coast Lighting. “The look reflects our concern for our environment whether it be a truly recycled product or one that mimics nature,” she said, and natural materials such as ceramic, glass and wood are used more now.

Energy efficient products remain important, and LEDs are a small but growing segment. “LED is more and more pronounced with each show,” said Joel Kent, director of marketing, Lite Source. More LED products are now available from factories, and along with decreasing price points and increasing light quality, this technology is branching out from task lighting, he added.

Right now, “many consumers are not willing to pay a premium for energy saving benefits apropos to lighting. However, once there is parity, the demand should accelerate,” said Smith, adding that LED technology “could dominate the marketplace in the next five years.”

Another reason for the acceleration into energy-efficient lighting: regulations such as California Title 20, said Rick Spicer, vice president, sales and marketing, Pacific Coast Lighting. “Although the majority of uses for energy-efficient lighting is initially more focused on hard-wired products, we are seeing more portable product moving in that direction as a byproduct of city, county and state regulations pushing the agenda.”

For Dallas introductions, go to http://www.hfnmag.com//product-gallery/2320