Heating Up at the Show

Known for its eco-friendly cookware, GreenPan will now offer ovenware to the U.S. market. green-pan.com

Known for its eco-friendly cookware, GreenPan will now offer ovenware to the U.S. market. green-pan.com

By Andrea Lillo

Proving to be two of the stronger performing categories during the recession, both cookware and bakeware saw plenty of newness at the recent International Home + Housewares Show. Here is a roundup of what was seen in both categories. 

Bakeware
As consumers turn to the comfort of baked goods in this economy, manufacturers turned to more bakeware at the Housewares Show, either expanding existing collections or getting into the category for the first time. 

Imusa entered the category because of retailers’ requests, said Manny Gaunaurd, president. The result was a “very sturdy” collection made of a higher-gauge metal. “We wanted to come in with a quality product,” he said. Retailing between $3.99 to $5.99 each, the line includes baking pans, cookie sheets, loaf pans, muffin pans, pizza pans and other specialty items.

BonJour also entered the category with a line of professional-weight aluminized steel bakeware, made with wire-reinforced rims for strength and durability. Oven safe to 500 degrees, the bakeware has a dark-colored interior and a light exterior to prevent baked items from overbrowning or burning.

Tramontina tried a different approach to baking, by using the stovetop instead. With its limited-edition Lyon cookware line, baking inserts can be used so consumers can bake on the stovetop, bypassing the oven all together. “It’s versatile cookware that also works as a true oven,” said Donna Parke, corporate accounts, marketing and services manager, adding that the food bakes faster and saves energy by not using the oven. Made in Brazil, the cookware is constructed of heavy-gauge forged aluminum.

Eco-friendly cookware company GreenPan debuted its ovenware to the U.S. market, which targets specialty stores. “This line will revitalize the market,” said Christophe Lambertz, account manager. Retails range from $29.99 to $59.99, and will include 10 SKUs.

Coating company Whitford expanded its high-gloss, long-lasting Eterna non-stick line with one for coil bakeware, which is more popular in Europe than in the U.S., said Kurt Mecray, worldwide business manager, consumer. The new coating is stain resistant, has a “phenomenal release” and has zero waste when applying the coating in the coil bakeware process.

Pyrex’s new Easy Grab glass bakeware is a modern spin on its classic look. Its wider, longer handles also have cut outs, making them easier to grab. “That’s not easy to manufacture,” said Craig Sampson, chief innovation officer, World Kitchen LLC. World Kitchen’s Corningware brand also debuted its artisanal-inspired Etch brand at the show, which has a handmade stoneware feel. T-Fal returned to bakeware with two new brands. Launching in the third quarter, EZ Grip offers wide handles with silicone grips and a textured surface.

Meyer also launched several new bakeware lines. Its metal bakeware and stoneware lines under the KitchenAid brand are completely new. The line is divided among a good, better, best strategy, with the best brand called Architect.

Meyer’s Rachael Ray line got colorful with the addition of glass ovenware. Offered in five translucent colors—orange, blue, green, yellow and red—the line is oven, microwave, freezer and dishwasher safe.

Cookware
Home cooks have a lot to look forward to this year, as new cookware will provide both performance and style for their kitchens.

Small appliance company De’Longhi entered the cookware category for the first time at the show, offering two families in its launch: Florence and Genoa. An entry level group, Florence is offered in 10- and 14-piece sets, with the 10-piece retailing for $199.95. Available in 14- and 17-piece sets, Genoa will retail at $299.95 for a 14-piece set. There will also be an open-stock line with three-piece sets.

TTU grew its Stax Living line, which is based on space efficiency and multifunctional items. Last year the line debuted with dinnerware, and based on that success the company entered the line with cookware, food-prep and storage items. The product is designed to be used in different ways.

Zwilling J.A. Henckels has partnered with green non-stick coating company Thermolon, using Thermolon Granite non-stick coating on its Zwilling J.A. Henckels cookware and Demeyere’s ControlInduc line. Zwilling cookware will also get “a big push this year” into the American market, said Nina Dols, marketing communication manager.

Groupe SEB’s Lagostina brand debuted several lines to the U.S. market. La Gran Ghisa is a cast-iron group that incorporates such Italian design influences as Vespa headlights into its pieces, while La Collezione Rossa uses a patented technology to make a red metallic, scratch-resistant exterior. And for its new risotto pan, olive wood—not metal—was used for the lid, and the product is available in October. The lid can also double as a trivet and is “very unique,” said Wendy Dyer, product manager, All-Clad-Lagostina cookware. “It can go from oven to table and looks just beautiful.”

Regal Ware reworked its Unity cookware line, moving away from branding it with chef Marcus Samuelsson. “We wanted to focus the collection more on the product than on the celebrity,” said David Lenz, senior vice president, chief human resources officer. Consisting of 13 pieces, each element of the line is constructed for a particular pan. 

Dansk has become the new home of Dr. Andrew Weil’s Healthy Kitchen line. “Dansk is an established company, known for its design,” Weil told HFN. Most of the cookware and small-electrics line remains the same, though the cookware is now more affordable, as it is now three-ply instead of five, said Jim Mylonas, vice president, Gorham and custom brands, Lenox.

Known for its eco-friendly cookware, GreenPan will now offer ovenware to the U.S. market. green-pan.com