January Rug Markets Wrap Up

       

       

Millennium Weavers

At the Atlanta International Area Rug Market, Millennium Weavers introduced its TexelWeave technology, which weaves different nylon fibers, along with polypropylene, on a Wilton loom. The rug is then dyed, and the different nylons take the dyes differently to create the pattern. “The nylon defines the pattern,” Mike Thompson, vice president of sales, told HFN.

“Nobody else has this technology,” added Jeff Knott, president and CEO. “One of my main strategies [since joining Millennium] has been to innovate … This is really a ‘wow’ factor.”

The first collection to use TexelWeave is called eMotion, which has 10 designs and 20 colors initially. While the group contains transitional designs, more traditional designs will be added later. The new company showed for the first time in the LR Resources showroom in AmericasMart.

 

Orian

At the Atlanta market, Orian Rugs debuted its new Gallery collection, which targets the furniture, specialty and independent regional retailers. The Gallery has 10 collections, including Shine On, which has gold and copper hues; the indoor/outdoor Four Seasons; Stria, an antique look; and American Heirloom, which has 1.5 million point designs. Made of polypropylene, there are 170 SKUs.

In addition, the company also added several executives to focus on sales for Gallery: Michael Donavan is vice president of sales for the Northeast region and Paul Crump is vice president of sales for the Southeast.

 

Capel

Capel added another custom program at the shows in January: Chenille Creations. An addition to the company’s Capel Custom program, Chenille Creations offers consumers 18 colors to choose from, which can be used in any combination of base, accent and border colors. Made in the U.S. in 24 standard sizes, the rugs will take about two to three weeks to ship.

“This collection allows consumers to participate in designing their own rugs and the pride of ownership that this brings,” said Allen Robertson, vice president of sales. “We have been so successful with high-quality premium cotton chenille braided rugs—especially for youth, bath and bedroom usage—that we felt this line would extend our appeal to consumers. This is a totally vertical construction as we produce our own chenille fiber.”

In addition, the company has added a new hangtag to its Made in America rugs, and which says in part “Support American Workers!” Its U.S. made product is about 45 percent of Capel’s line. “Our Made In America rugs are the catalyst we feel that is driving our sales increase,” Robertson said.

 

Jaipur

Designer and television personality Chayse Dacoda launched her new rug line—her first—at Jaipur at Las Vegas Market, and which consists of handtufted, Tibetan woven and transitional handknotted designs.

In the past, Dacoda sometimes had trouble finding the right rug for one of her interior design projects, she told HFN, so this collection will help fill that missing look in the marketplace. She added that it was fun to see the rug designs form from creation to the final product, which included an inspiring visit to Jaipur’s weavers in India.

“The overall reaction to the Chayse line was really exciting,” said Josh Roberts, vice president, sales and marketing, Jaipur. “Our customers loved her sense of style and color and overall the designs are really fresh. Additionally, the designs hit on all of the key trend/hot buttons in terms of simplicity, tone-on-tone colors and texture with the use of art silk.”

Initial shipments will begin in the fourth quarter. Retails for the collection will be $529 for a handtufted 5-by-8, $1,320 for a handknotted 5-by-8 and $1,670 for a handknotted Tibetan 5-by-8.

Dacoda, whose background includes hosting decorating shows on HGTV and TLC, definitely had ideas on how her collection would unfold. “I’m math oriented,” she said, having majored in finance, so geometrics are included among the designs. In April, more ethnic looks will join the collection. In addition, for 2013, she somehow “wants to bring more humor into rugs,” she said. “Design needs more comedy.”